Educating Pakistani Youth on Their Human Rights

Students at a government school near Islamabad hold up posters with the articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights included in the educators' package available through the Youth for Human Rights website.

Students at a government school near Islamabad hold up posters with the articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights included in the educators’ package available through the Youth for Human Rights website.

The first step in resolving human rights issues is education.

The first step in resolving human rights issues is education.

Children at this school, who were working in the brick kilns, returned to school when this program was implemented.

Children at this school, who were working in the brick kilns, returned to school when this program was implemented.

Youth for Human Rights believes human rights education can improve the lives of Pakistani youth.

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA, UNITED STATES, November 27, 2019 /EINPresswire.com/ — On the eve of the 71st anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, December 10, Pakistan’s youth lag behind most countries for education and other basic rights. According to the KidsRights Index, an annual global index that ranks how countries adhere to and are equipped to improve children’s rights, of 183 countries ranked, Pakistan was found at 154.

An article in the Daily Pakistan last year estimated “around 10 million Pakistani kids have to work to help their families at school-going age. Many are sold as domestic servants who are treated as slaves with no rights.” It also points out that the majority of Pakistani children have to toil in the agriculture sector without compensation while others work at workshops. They are denied an education that could improve their chances of becoming employed.

While the government is working to right these issues, the problem is systemic, driven by poverty and the huge proportion of the population comprised of children or young adults. Nearly a third of the country is younger than 15 and more than 50 percent under 25.

Youth for Human Rights believes that vital to improving conditions for children is educating those who are in school on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. By understanding that the 30 rights enshrined in the document belong to all people, young and old, they will become advocates for programs that provide these rights to all segments of the population.

In one community, where most of the children work as laborers in the brick kilns, educating those attending school on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights resulted in 35 who were working in the kilns returning to school, as the students reached out to help their friends. That was just a start in one community, but it shows the power of making these rights known.

Youth for Human Rights International is the youth component of United for Human Rights (UHR), an international, not-for-profit organization dedicated to implementing the Universal Declaration of Human Rights at local, regional, national and international levels. Its membership is comprised of individuals, educators and groups throughout the world who are actively forwarding the knowledge and protection of human rights by and for all Mankind.

The Church of Scientology and Scientologists support Youth for Human Rights and make its educational materials available free of charge. Watch the public service announcements that bring the Universal Declaration of Human Rights to life to children the world over on the Scientology Network.

Learn more about what the Church of Scientology and Scientologists do to forward human rights on the Scientology Newsroom.

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Source: EIN Presswire